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2022 Yukon Mountain Bike Team

Last update: June 3, 2022

The Yukon Mountain Bike Team is back for 2022 summer training with an Elite or Competition membership. You must be 13 years or older to participate.

Both membership programs will run from May 10 until September 8, timed with the end of year 2022 Yukon XC Mountain Bike Championships on September 10.

Program staff includes our head coach and a team of trained assistant coaches.

Register now

Elite membership

The Elite membership is $425 (plus a CAY membership) and includes:

  • Training 2 days a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays
  • Each day will include 2 hours of on-bike fitness and technical work to make athletes better mountain bikers

Athletes don't need a XC mountain bike to participate, but an efficient trail bike is ideal.

Competition membership

The Competition membership is $650 (plus a CAY membership) and includes:

  • Training 3 days a week on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays
  • Each day will include 2 hours of on-bike fitness and technical work, mixed with road cycling to make athletes better mountain bikers
  • Saturday training will vary from 1 hour to 4 hours in duration

Athletes that sign up for the Competition membership will also receive 2 to 3 goal-setting seasons and a personalized seasonal training plan for the duration of the months we will be training.

The Competition membership is for those athletes that want to be competitive at the national level of XCO and XCC mountain bike racing and attend the Canada Summer Games.

Athletes will be highly encouraged to obtain an XC mountain bike and will need access to a road bike.

Upcoming team events

Canada Summer Games

This event requires pre-qualification as we are only permitted to bring 3 males and 3 female athletes. The 2022 Canada Summer Games will be a paid trip by Sport Yukon.

Questions about the Yukon Mountain Bike Team

The purpose of the Yukon Mountain bike team is to develop great athletes and better people.

If you are interested in becoming an athlete that represents the Yukon across Canada, please contact our Head Coach, Hudson Lucier at hudson.lucier.pro@gmail.com

2022 Canada Summer Games Team Yukon cycling athlete selection criteria

Last update: June 3, 2022

June 3, 2022. CAY has updated the mountain bike eligibility criteria to include 3 Yukon-based qualification events. No outside-the-Yukon mountain bike event travel will be organized.

The 2022 Canada Summer Games in Niagara, Ontario will provide an opportunity for Yukon athletes to experience Canada's largest multi-sport event at a national level.

Cycling Association of Yukon's goals are:

  1. To create the atmosphere for our athletes to have a best-ever Team Yukon performance while demonstrating positive spirit and mutual respect.
  2. To provide Yukon athletes with the experience of a high level of competition with support prior to and at the Canada Summer Games.
  3. To amass as many points as possible in cycling to help contribute to the overall success of Team Yukon, across all sports.

Date of team selection (mountain bike and road)

Team Yukon cycling athletes will be selected no later than June 30, 2022.

Conditions of athlete selection

Selection to the 2022 Canada Summer Games Yukon cycling team does not guarantee Cycling Association of Yukon (CAY) and/or high performance program funding.

CAY reserves the right to modify the 2022 Canada Summer Games Team Yukon cycling athlete selection criteria as it deems necessary where a criteria for the selection is no longer deemed appropriate. In the event that the selection criteria is modified, CAY will post an announcement on our website announcing the changes.

Athletes can try out for and be selected for both the mountain bike and road team.


Mountain bike

  • Canada Summer Games competition dates: August 8 to 12, 2022
  • Races: Cross-country, relay and sprint
  • Participants: 3 female, 3 male

6 is the maximum mountain bike team size. CAY reserves the right to alter team size due to non-performance, lack of commitment to training/racing or unacceptable behavior at training, races and outside competitions.

Age limits

  • Athletes must be between 16 and 21 years of age as of December 31, 2022 (year of birth: 2006 to 2001).
  • If there are fewer than 3 female athletes 16 to 21 years of age, then athletes who are 22 to 24 years old may be considered.
  • Athletes born in 2007 who hold a CAY Youth UCI race licence may compete if CAY applies to and gains permission from Cycling Canada, and if the athlete meets race time standards.

Equipment requirements

  • Clipless pedals are required to participate in the Canada Summer Games.
  • Although not a requirement, a cross-country focused mountain bike will be an asset at the Canada Summer Games.

For further information, refer to the 2022 Canada Summer Games Cycling: Mountain Bike Technical Package.

Eligibility criteria

Athletes must:

  • Participate in 3 races. Athletes will be scored on their best time/result across 3 events, including the following:
    • Yukon-based Canada Summer Games trials mountain bike races sanctioned by Cycling Association of Yukon.
    • 3 is the minimum number of races. CAY also encourages potential team members to participate in other cycling competitions whenever possible.
  • Demonstrate the ability to consistently ride features that are found on XCO courses on an athlete's chosen race bike.
  • Attend 6 training sessions with the Yukon Mountain Bike Team before the 2022 Canada Summer Games.
  • With assistance from the Yukon Mountain Bike Team head coach, create, participate in and follow a 2022 training plan. If an athlete already has their own coach, they will review this plan with the Team Yukon coach.
  • Train on their mountain bike, road bike and in other sports (such as running, skiing, swimming and team sports) to ensure sufficient preparation.
  • After the 2022 riding and race season starts, ride with other potential mountain bike team athletes and skilled adults a minimum of 5 days per week.
  • Demonstrate good behaviour and understand that athletes represent the Yukon at all times. Unsportsmanlike behaviour will not be tolerated from either athletes or parents. If necessary, a performance bond will be required if behaviour is a concern to CAY. This bond will be based on the cost of a return air travel ticket at the athlete's expense. Refer to the Team Yukon handbook for more information.

Questions about mountain bike athlete selection criteria

If you have questions, contact our mountain bike head coach Hudson Lucier at Hudson.Lucier.Pro@gmail.com.


Road

  • Canada Summer Games competition dates: August 16 to 20, 2022
  • Races: Individual time trial, road, criterium
  • Participants: 5 female, 4 male

9 is the maximum road team size. CAY reserves the right to alter team size due to non-performance, lack of commitment to training/racing or unacceptable behavior at training, races and outside competitions.

Age limits

  • Athletes must be between 16 and 21 years of age as of December 31, 2022 (year of birth: 2006 to 2001).
  • If there are fewer than 4 female athletes 16 to 21 years of age, then athletes who are 22 to 24 years old may be considered.
  • Athletes born in 2007 who hold a CAY Youth UCI race licence may compete if CAY applies to and gains permission from Cycling Canada, and if the athlete meets race time standards.

Equipment requirements

  • 1 road bike is allowed. Some parts of the bike can be changed from each event to another such as wheels, handlebars and pedals, but the frame must remain the same across all events.
  • Athlete bikes are required to be in excellent mechanical condition with a 10 or 11 speed cassette. There are no gear restrictions for Canada Summer Games. If Team Yukon does not have aerobars that fit an athlete's bike, they must buy their own.

For further information, refer to the 2022 Canada Summer Games Cycling: Road Technical Package.

Eligibility criteria

Athletes must:

  • Participate in 7 mandatory races. Athletes will be scored on their best results from 2 time trials, 2 road races and 2 criteriums.
    • 2022 Yukon Energy Road Championships (All events: individual time trial, road race and criterium).
      • June 10 to 12.
    • 1 2022 Yukon multi-day stage race (All events: individual time trial, road race and hillclimb).
    • 1 other 2022 criterium.
      • There will be a weekly criterium series; dates to be announced.
    • 1 2022 road race outside of Yukon.
      • We are planning to attend the BC Provincial Road Championships (May 28 to 29) and Future Champions Camp (June 30 to July 3). If an athlete cannot attend these events, similar races outside Yukon can be considered with prior consultation with the Team Yukon road head coach.
    • 7 is the minimum number of races. CAY also encourages potential team members to participate in other cycling competitions whenever possible.
  • After the 2022 riding and race season starts, ride with other potential road team athletes and skilled adults a minimum of 5 days per week to build team tactics and cohesion. If unable to attend all sessions, some training may be done individually in consultation with the Team Yukon road head coach.
  • With assistance from the Team Yukon road head coach, create, participate in and follow a 2022 training plan. If an athlete already has their own coach, they will review this plan with the Team Yukon coach.
  • Commit to regularly maintain a training diary including date, type, duration, description and weekly training volume to be shared with the road head coach bi-weekly.
  • Demonstrate good behaviour and understand that athletes represent the Yukon at all times. Unsportsmanlike behaviour will not be tolerated from either athletes or parents. If necessary, a performance bond will be required if behaviour is a concern to CAY. This bond will be based on the cost of a return air travel ticket at the athlete's expense. Refer to the Team Yukon handbook for more information.

Athlete selection

Based on time standards for races

Athletes must be able to race at the minimum average speed in an individual time trial, road race and criterium. Athletes will be ranked according to their average race speed in relation to the time standards, from fastest to slowest.

Based on results and by committee choice

Team selection:

  1. Winner on Overall Points
  2. Second on Overall Points
  3. Committees choice
  4. Committees choice

Performance, participation, commitment and behavior in training/practices/races will factor into an athlete's selection to Team Yukon.

Up to 2 reserves will be nominated as Committees Choice.

Optional race and training events

There will be other Yukon road cycling events that potential team members will be encouraged to race in but these will not impact athlete selection. For example, Kluane Chilkat International Bike Relay and Southern Lakes Gran Fondo.

A multi-day road team training camp is being organized and will be held in June 2022. Dates to be announced.

Questions about road athlete selection criteria

If you have questions, contact our road head coach Trena Irving at trenairving@gmail.com.

Yukon winter urban cycling tips

Last update: November 22, 2021

Don’t let the snow, ice and cold weather stop you from riding your bike to work, school, for errands and for fun.

Wearing the right gear and modifying your bike for winter riding will make a big difference in your comfort, enjoyment and safety.

This is our list of Yukon-specific urban cycling tips for those new to riding their bike in winter or to improve your winter cycling experience.

If you have suggestions of your own, email info@yukoncycling.com.

Prepare and maintain your bike

You don’t need a specific type of bike to ride in winter, but you should consider a few equipment modifications to have more confidence and be safer.

  • Drop tire pressure (PSI) on both fat bike tires and regular sized tires for more traction. You want as much rubber as possible to make contact with the snow, especially your back tire. A "softer" tire absorbs bumps better, allowing you to keep control.
  • Before each ride, check your tire pressure. If it’s too low, pump your tires up.
  • Many people use studded tires for increased safety on ice and slippery surfaces. You don’t need studded tires but they do help tremendously.
  • Clean and lubricate your chain, drivetrain and other bike parts at least once weekly. We recommend a lightweight, wet chain lube (one that’s designed for winter or wet conditions) so that your chain doesn't get gummy in the cold. In the winter you don’t want a faulty chain.
  • Dry your brakes with a clean cloth after a particularly snowy or wet ride. This helps to avoid rust and corrosion.
  • Lock and keep your bike outside. Opinions will be different, but we recommend if you ride to work, school or for errands leave your bike outside. Taking your bike inside to a 20°C building from being outside at -25°C means a drastic swing in temperature. This can result in excess moisture building up in bike cables, drivetrain and brakes. Before you start to ride again outside, spin the cranks and wheels, and test your brakes.

Layer your clothing, including head, hand and footwear

Don’t overdress, but also don’t underdress. Finding your personal balance is key and it will take you a few tries to get it right.

  • Wear a base, thermal and windproof, but breathable layering system. Wearing a big warm puffy jacket will feel great...until you hit your first uphill.
  • Wear a helmet and windproof thermal cap. Many riders switch to a ski or snowboard helmet in the winter for more wind protection, especially around their ears but regular bike helmets are perfectly fine too.
  • A neck warmer will keep your neck and upper chest protected from wind and cold.
  • Many cyclists wear a balaclava, but be sure it’s one with a large enough mouth hole so that you can easily breathe.
  • A good pair of winter gloves or mitts, worn with liner gloves is vital. Use pogies if you are prone to getting cold hands. Avoid overly thick mitts as it will be difficult to pull your brakes or change gears.
  • On your feet, we recommend a pair of vapour barrier socks and/or multiple socks (thin, wicking layer and thicker wool layer).
  • The average winter boot can be sufficient, but depends on your feet. No matter what you wear, be sure to close any loose or open areas of the boots with gaiters or straps to keep warm air in, and snow out.
  • Use flat pedals instead of clipless pedals so you can easily get on and off your bike.

Change your expectations and plan ahead

Riding in winter takes patience and practice. Consider your route before you leave.

  • Start slowly to help gain confidence and refine your skills. We recommend you begin by only riding one-way and taking the bus or getting a ride home with a friend.
  • Don’t push a big gear. Find your pace, settle in and teach yourself how to be comfortable with slippery connections between your tires and the snow.
  • When it’s really cold, try to stick to rides that are shorter in length so you don’t put yourself into a dangerous situation if something goes wrong.
  • Carry a charged phone in a warm pocket in case of emergency. At some point, there’s a chance you’ll crash or have a mechanical. If the weather is bad, you need to be prepared for the worst and have an exit strategy.

Avoid busy roads and stay aware

Safe and connected urban cycling infrastructure around downtown Whitehorse is getting better, but we’ve still got a ways to go. Cyclists outside downtown Whitehorse and in Yukon communities will have their own challenges, so take your time and be mindful of weather conditions.

  • We recommend that you ride your proposed route on a weekend or walk your route before riding it to work or school.
  • If possible, we recommend that cyclists stay off busy roads and instead use paths and less busy roads to get around. You may need to get creative with routes. What you ride in summer may not be passable in winter.
  • Drivers in motor vehicles won’t always see you, no matter how many lights you have or how many reflective materials you wear. Be defensive and put your personal safety first.
  • Check over your shoulders and look both ways before making your way across an intersection. Don’t cross in front of drivers who are rapidly approaching as they may not be able to stop in time due to ice or slippery road conditions.
  • If it’s snowed recently, be extra careful and give yourself more time to get places. Regularly changing conditions is part of the fun of riding in winter!
  • Look well ahead for obstructions in your path, off-camber hard packed snow surfaces or pinch points with traffic.
  • Give way to pedestrians on paths. Be courteous and recognize that they may not be able to hear you coming.
  • Use a bell when passing cyclists, pedestrians and others. If you’re on an e-bike, slow down when you’re near other people.
  • Follow the rules of the road, Be mindful of winter driving road safety.

Be seen

The brighter you are, the better.

  • Wear a high-visibility vest and other high-visibility straps or gear.
  • If possible, try to avoid wearing a dark coloured jacket. Brighter colours are easier to see and reflect light sources better.
  • Use white lights on the front of your bike and red lights in the rear. We also recommend running lights or reflective strips on the side of your bike. The goal is to be visible from different angle and positions. Remember, the Yukon is very dark in winter!
  • Light batteries drain faster in cold weather, so fully charge your batteries before any ride and keep additional batteries on hand for non-rechargeable lights.

Riding your bike in winter to work, school and for errands can be a lot of fun. It’s a great way to get exercise, clear your mind and enjoy the beautiful place we live.

We hope that this list of Yukon-specific urban cycling tips helps make your winter biking experiences safer and more enjoyable.

Please share with your friends, family and others.

Refund policy

Last update: April 22, 2022

Cycling Association of Yukon understands that money is valuable, and circumstances arise that can cause a change in your plans.

We use revenue from our memberships, programs and events to fund these initiatives, pay staff, buy supplies, keep equipment operational and support our community. For programs and events, we forecast our resource planning based on how many riders we are expecting.

Our refund policy came into effect on November 17, 2021.

Membership refunds

A Cycling Association of Yukon membership is not refundable. Exceptions may be made for season-ending injuries or other medical reasons with documentation from a medical professional.

Contact info@yukoncycling.com for more information.

Program registration refunds

A program registration is not refundable. Should a registrant have a medical issue that prevents them from participating in a program, that fee may be transferred to a future program within the same season with documentation from a medical professional.

To preserve your ability to transfer you must email info@yukoncycling.com with a letter from a medical professional by 11:59 p.m. no later than 3 days prior to the start date of the program you are going to miss.

If Cycling Association of Yukon receives no such documentation by the deadline, the rider forfeits their ability to transfer to a future date.

Event registration refunds

An event registration is not refundable. Should a registrant have a medical issue that prevents them from participating in an event, that fee may be transferred to a future event within the same season with documentation from a medical professional.

To preserve your ability to transfer you must email info@yukoncycling.com with a letter from a medical professional by 11:59 p.m. no later than 3 days prior to the event you are going to miss.

If Cycling Association of Yukon receives no such documentation by the deadline, the rider forfeits their ability to transfer to a future date.

Exceptions to our refund policy

Cycling Association of Yukon reserves the right to make special exceptions to the policy when we deem it necessary.

Email newsletter archive

Last update: June 7, 2022

Our email newsletter is regularly updated with information about events, programs, clubs and other Yukon cycling topics.

Read past issues

Team Yukon cycling programs

Last update: April 8, 2022

A key responsibility of Cycling Association of Yukon is to train and send youth athletes to Canada Summer Games events.

Led by coaches Hudson Lucier (mountain bike) and Trena Irving (road) we are preparing ourselves for the 2022 Canada Summer Games in Niagara, Ontario. For cycling, this means mountain bike and road teams.

Our goal is to send female and male athletes to these events in August 2022.

We also want to send a mountain bike and road team to Newfoundland and Labrador in 2025.

Get more information about Team Yukon.

Looking for interested athletes

Canada Summer Games is for youth between the ages of 16 to 21.

  • For the 2022 event, we are seeking youth who are 15 to 20 years old today.
  • For the 2025 event, youth who are 12 years or older are welcome to start with us now.

Athletes will train with our coaches on bike skills, strength training and intensity work. We will set goals with each person with the plan to not only improve technical skills, but become better all-around athletes. There will also be races to participate in.

All you need is a bike and a commitment and passion for improving yourself.

How to register for Team Yukon cycling programs

Mountain bike

We start training on May 2 and will finish on September 8, 2022.

Get more information about the Yukon Mountain Bike Team.

Road

Our road program is run by coach Trena Irving through the U Kon Echelon bike club.

Send an email to Trena Irving trenairving@gmail.com if you’re interested or would like more information.

2020 Yukon cycling survey results

Last update: March 24, 2021

Thanks to everyone who provided feedback on our 2020 Yukon cycling survey. The survey was completed by 504 people.

The CAY board is using this information to update our strategic plan and provide related resources and support to Yukon cycling clubs and organizations.

We’ve organized this report page into distinct topics. Choose any of the following links to read more.

Demographics

  • 92% of survey respondents were from Whitehorse.
  • Other respondents were from Dawson City, Mount Lorne, Marsh Lake, Carcross, Ibex Valley, Teslin, Haines Junction, Burwash Landing, Watson Lake or other small areas near these Yukon communities.
  • Over 40% have lived in Yukon for over 20 years. 23% have been here between 4 and 10 years, while 22% between 11 and 20 years.

Key takeaways

  • Respondents see advocacy, both for on and off-road cycling of various disciplines, as an important and under-served function of cycling organizations in Yukon.
  • Advocacy and education around commuting and urban cycling in particular are viewed as a gap in Yukon.
  • There is a desire and need for more communication and outreach to the cycling community, on a variety of subjects. For example, what clubs/organizations exist, what they do, cycling education and etiquette and what events are being offered and when.
  • Many respondents have not been a member of any Yukon cycling organization and often this is because they don't know what organizations exist or what the benefits of joining are.
  • People want more inclusive events that feel welcoming, non-competitive and represent the diversity of skills, abilities, ages, and genders that exist in the Yukon cycling community.
  • A feeling of community, comradery and inclusiveness is important to many people.
  • This aligns with the fact that most people who responded to the survey are interested in riding for recreation, fun, and fitness rather than competition and racing.
  • There is a strong desire for skill development for recreational riding, as opposed to training camps.
  • Respondents were generally more happy with the quality of dirt and snow trails than the quality of urban paths and roads for cycling.
  • Despite many people citing e-bikes as too expensive, ownership is expected to grow with an aging population and the availability of a government rebate and so should be considered in planning moving forward.
  • Children and youth participating in cycling is also growing, particularly with an interest in mountain biking. There is a desire to see more events and categories within events targeted at children and youth.

Riding bicycles

  • 76% of respondents have been riding a bike for more than 20 years.
  • People regularly ride their bikes, with 39% of respondents stating they ride 4 to 5 days per week. 37% ride 2 to 3 days per week.
  • The majority of respondents ride their bikes all year round, with 60% riding in winter as well as spring, summer and fall.
  • Over 80% of respondents said they ride their bikes on dirt trails.
  • This was closely followed by urban and bike paths and paved roads (both ridden by about 78% of respondents).
  • 59% of respondents said they ride gravel roads, about 53% said they ride snow trails in winter, while only 9% ride BMX and jumps and only 4% ride skateparks and participate in street riding.
  • Among those respondents who said they ride other types of terrain (about 7.5%), the main terrain included:
  • Indoor spinning.
  • The bike park.
  • Multi use trails and old mining roads.

Electric/e-bikes

  • The majority of respondents (62%) said they did not intend to buy an e-bike in the next year while about 27% said they were undecided. About 11% said they did intend to buy.
  • Among those who provided an explanation for why or why not they intended to purchase an e-bike, the main reasons cited for not purchasing included:
  • A preference for using self-power and/or getting exercise.
  • The infrastructure for cycling is unsafe.
  • They are too expensive, and/or the expense can’t be justified.
  • They are not versatile enough.
  • Don’t need one (including those who said they already bought one).
  • They are too heavy.
  • There is concern for e-waste/battery replacement.
  • The main reasons in favour of purchasing included:
  • There is a government rebate available.
  • To improve commuting/running errands and/or replace a car for commuting/running errands.
  • For assistance going up large hills or long distances.
  • For fun.
  • To be able to continue biking in the face of physical impediments.

Motivations to ride a bike

  • When asked why they ride their bikes, almost all respondents (95%) said it was for recreation and fun.
  • 87% said it was to gain and maintain fitness, while 62% said it was to commute to and from work or school.
  • Almost half (47% of respondents) said it was to run errands, while only 34% said it was to compete and race at events.
  • About 14% of respondents had other reasons, which mainly centred around:
  • Exercising with their dog(s).
  • Travel, backcountry trips and outdoor pursuits.
  • Reducing their environmental impact.
  • Reasons related to family (for example, teaching or role-modelling for kids).
  • Spending time with friends and on fun and wellness.
  • Using bikes as their only means of transportation.
  • Employment or volunteer reasons.

Membership in Yukon cycling clubs or organizations

  • The most common answer from respondents (almost 43%) was that they had not been a part of any Yukon cycling club or organizations in the past 5 years.
  • Of those who were a member, the most commonly reported membership (almost 42% of respondents) was to Contagious Mountain Bike Club (CMBC).
  • Membership in Velonorth Cycling Club, Whitehorse Urban Cycling Coalition, U Kon Echelon Cycling Club, Team Boreale and Terra Riders made up the remainder.
  • Among those who selected “other club or organization”, specified organizations included:
  • KCIBR.
  • Yukon Triathlon.
  • Previous clubs or race series, no longer held.
  • Informal/non-incorporated groups or clubs, particularly on social media.
  • Outside groups, such as SORCA and IMBA.
  • Notably a few people listed Dirt Girls, which suggests there is a distinction to some people between CMBC and Dirt Girls.

Motivations to join a Yukon cycling club or organization

  • Over half of respondents (almost 51%) said it was to show support for advocacy for trail maintenance and development.
  • Almost 41% said it was to participate in group rides, almost 40% said it was to participate in competitive organized cycling events and almost 39% said it was to participate in non-competitive cycling events.
  • The least common responses included to participate in winter trail grooming (about 10%), to purchase club clothing and merchandise (about 5%) and to provide financial support for competitive athletes and coaches (about 4%).
  • Among those who cited other reasons (about 9% of respondents) those reasons included:
  • To meet others who want to do casual or recreational rides.
  • To have access to information on trails, events, etc.
  • Because their children participate in events.

Motivations to purchase a Yukon cycling club or organization membership

  • A number of respondents commented that they had no desire to join an organization, and that their cycling was a very individual activity.
  • If there was a desire to join, respondents seek:
  • More inclusive events and rides, for all skills, abilities, ages and genders.
  • More advocacy for safe urban cycling infrastructure.
  • Bike maintenance and repair workshops and co-operative equipment.
  • More advocacy and support for building and maintaining trails, and building a wider variety of trails. For example, jump trails or trails in different neighbourhoods.
  • Skill development.
  • Financial or other incentives. For example, more/better discounts, reduced entrance fees to events or members-only events.
  • Education on cycling safety.
  • Events throughout the Yukon and not just in Whitehorse.
  • Events focused on children and youth.
  • Better access to information on trail conditions, events, etc.
  • More options for training and racing.
  • Respondents asked for better outreach on organizations that exist, what they do and the benefits of membership.

Participation in events

  • The majority of respondents (79%) said they participate in events to challenge themselves and gain fitness.
  • A little over half of respondents said it was to ride their bikes in different places or terrain (53%), to maintain relationships with people they know (52%) or to motivate themselves to train for something (51%).
  • About a third of respondents said it was to meet new people, while only approximately 5% of respondents said it was prepare for representing Team Yukon at major games and competitions.
  • Other reasons included:
  • To have fun.
  • To develop skills and fitness.
  • To encourage and promote involvement of children and youth.
  • Because friends and family wanted them to.
  • For employment.

Reasons people don’t participate in events

  • Almost a third of respondents cited scheduling conflicts (almost 30%), other reasons not listed (about 29%), and/or that they didn’t know the events were happening (about 29%).
  • About 28% of respondents said they don’t feel like they fit in, about a quarter said they don’t have time, and about 22% said the events that are offered don’t appeal to them.
  • Other reasons included:
  • Not interested in organized events.
  • Don’t enjoy competitive events.
  • Prefer to just ride by themselves or with friends and family.
  • People feel they lack the fitness or skill to participate, and/or the events are not designed for them. For example, for their age group.
  • It is challenging to fit in events with competing demands such as family, work and other sports.

Communications about upcoming events or activities

  • The most common response was by social media (about 68% of respondents), followed by email newsletter (54%) and website (37%).
  • A third of respondents cited friends’ recommendation/word of mouth as a desired form of communication about events and activities.
  • Other suggestions included:
  • Flyers and posters.
  • A single calendar of events.
  • Strava.

Quality of urban cycling infrastructure

  • Among those who answered this question, 51% rated the quality of infrastructure (paths, bike lanes, intersections and/or roads) as somewhat safe and enjoyable.
  • 26% of respondents said the quality is not very safe and enjoyable.
  • Main suggestions in the comments included:
  • Improve the connections of paths and road intersections where cyclists meet motorists. Some are viewed as very dangerous.
  • Addition of protected bike lanes that are maintained in winter.
  • Distracted drivers and lack of safety education for both cyclists and motorists.
  • Provide a safe alternative to riding on highway shoulders for those who live outside of downtown Whitehorse.

Quality of trail infrastructure

  • Among those who answered this question, about 62% rated the quality and diversity of trails as excellent or great.
  • Slightly more than 12% of respondents said the quality and diversity is either somewhat or not very good.
  • Main suggestions in the comments included:
  • Yukon would benefit from more trail diversity, including flow trails, adaptive mountain bike trails and trails with more challenging technical features.
  • Expand grooming of winter trails to areas other than Grey Mountain and Mt Mac.

Dirt ‘n Soul Mountain Bike Park

  • Almost half of respondents (49%) said they or those in their household had used the Dirt ‘n Soul Mountain Bike Park in the past 5 years.
  • Among those who said they had used it, the pump track was the most commonly cited feature that was used (82%), followed by the wooden drops (almost 70%), the skinnies (about 68%) and the offshoot trail with tabletops and berms (about 65%).
  • Only 56% of respondents who had used the Dirt ‘n Soul park reported using the jump line, and only about 31% reported using the wall ride.
  • Only 15 respondents noted other features that they used, most commonly the teeter totters (which have been removed due to decay) the skinnies and the bridges.

Improving Yukon cycling

  • Advocate the city for better cycling paths that connect existing paths for a cohesive Whitehorse network, connections to country residential areas, safer cycling infrastructure (for example, protected bike lanes) and improved clearance of snow from paths and bike lanes.
  • Make backcountry bikepacking routes more accessible.
  • Provide information and tips on bike touring and bikepacking.
  • Education for drivers and cyclists.
  • Children and youth categories at all events.
  • Enduro races.
  • Support building more challenging trails.
  • More trail maintenance to prevent degradation as the number of mountain bikers continues to increase in Whitehorse.
  • Maintain good working relationships with other trail groups.
  • Bike maintenance and repair courses.
  • Improve trail markers and maps.
  • Remove gravel on roadsides.
  • Events inclusive of older adults and e-bikers.
  • Secure and covered bike parking downtown.
  • Develop a “one stop shop” website for all things Yukon cycling.
  • Ensure the cycling community is not elitist.
  • Ensure Yukon is part of Canada’s Active Transportation Strategy.
  • Find ways for children and youth who can’t afford bikes to participate in cycling.
  • Casual group rides.
  • Move all cycling organizations under one umbrella to limit need for different insurance policies, memberships and spreading out of volunteer efforts.
  • Build a BMX track.
  • Downhill races, more trails at Mt Sima.
  • Hire summer students for trail maintenance.
  • Consider charging for winter trail grooming and summer trail work.
  • More singletrack linking existing riding areas.
  • More infrastructure such as outhouses at popular trailheads.
  • More financial support for Mt Sima.

Rain, storm and lightning guidance

Last update: March 10, 2021

Local weather should be monitored by the event organizer or club representative. Events must not be held during conditions of thunder and lightning, excessively high winds or in the unlikely event of a possible tornado.

CAY highly recommends that each event have a daily weather update posted in strategic positions throughout the registration and entrance area.

Participants and commissaries will be informed of this guidance.

In the event of thunder or lightning, the course will be evacuated and shelter found. 30 minutes must pass from the last clap of thunder or flash of lightning before riders may resume their competition. The next occurrence begins a new 30-minute cycle.

No outdoor activities will be initiated when thunder and/or lightning is present.

If thunder and lightning occur once activities have started, utilize the flash-to-bang method for determining the distance of lightning. Count the number of seconds between seeing the lightning and hearing the clap of thunder. If the time between flash-to-bang is 30 seconds or less it is time stop the event and seek shelter.

Lightning that is closer than 10 km poses a risk to participants. The formula is roughly the time between flash-to-bang divided by 3 equals the distance away in kilometers. For example, if the time from flash to bang is 30 seconds then the storm is 10 km away (30 seconds / 3 = 10 km).

The storm's distance and your location will determine when there is a need for evacuation to a safe shelter. A safe shelter is defined as a sturdy building that has metal plumbing or wiring, or both to electrically ground the structure. A shed or a shack is not a safe shelter.

Stay away from tall or individual trees, lone objects (flagpoles), metal objects, standing pools of water and open fields. Avoid close contact with others by maintaining a distance of 4-6 meters.

Allow 30 minutes to pass after the last sound of thunder or sight of lightning before resuming any outdoor activities including walking outside of your shelter.

At CAY sanctioned events, the Chief Commissaire in consultation with their partners will be responsible for making decisions regarding stoppage, delay or evacuation due to thunder, lightning or other extreme weather patterns.

Terms and conditions

Last update: March 4, 2021

About this website

This website is operated by Cycling Association of Yukon (CAY) under the domain names “www.yukoncycling.com" and “www.yukoncycling.ca” (“CAY Websites”).

By using, accessing, viewing or otherwise relying on the information, graphics and materials on the CAY Websites (“Material on this website”) you agree to be subject to these terms of use and the privacy policy.

In addition to the terms in this document, there may also be specific terms governing your use of, and access to, certain sections of the CAY Websites. Those specific terms also form part of these terms of use and you will be bound by them. You should review them wherever they are accessible by you on the CAY Websites.

Links to other websites

The CAY Websites may contain links to other websites operated by third parties (“Third Party Websites”). Any such links are provided for convenience only. CAY does not endorse, approve of or recommend those Third Party Websites, and is not responsible for the information, graphics and material they contain (“Third Party Material”).

All offers to sell and statements relating to goods and services available on Third Party Websites are the responsibility of and given by the Third Party Website operator. In so far as such offers and statements are made on the CAY Websites, such offers and statements are made by CAY on behalf of the Third Party Website operator. CAY expressly disclaims acting in any other respect on behalf of Third Party Website operators.

Subject to any rights at law which cannot be excluded, CAY makes no warranties or representations:

  • About the quality, accuracy, merchantability or fitness for purpose of Third Party Material or products or services available through Third Party Websites; or that Third Party Material does not infringe the intellectual property rights of any person.
  • When you follow a link on the CAY Websites, Third Party Material may be displayed in your browser framed by Material on this website. This material is also Third Party Material for the purpose of these Terms of Use.
  • By linking Material on this website to Third Party Material, CAY does not authorize the re-production of Third Party Material. If you download software from a Third Party Website, use of that software may be subject to a licence agreement between you and the Third Party Website operator. To the extent permitted by law, CAY accepts no responsibility or liability for that software.
  • CAY may receive payments from operators of Third Party Websites in relation to goods or services supplied by the operator as a result of you linking to the Third Party Website from the CAY Websites.

Product information and supply

Material on this website may contain general information about CAY or related party products and services. Unless expressly stated otherwise, this information:

  • Does not constitute an offer or inducement to enter into a legally binding contract; does not form part of the terms and conditions for CAY or related party products and services; and is not intendedto be financial advice and does not take into account any user’s objectives, financial situation or needs.
  • All information is subject to change without notice. CAY recommends that you seek independent advice before acting upon Material on this website or Third Party Material. For further information about a particular product or service please contact CAY by email info@yukoncycling.com.
  • All applications for credit are subject to CAY’s normal credit approval criteria.
  • Unless expressly agreed otherwise, products and services referred to on the CAY Websites will be provided only to Canadian residents. These products and services are generally not available to non-Canadian residents because they may not comply with non-Canadian laws.

Warranties

While we have made every effort to ensure that information is free from error, CAY does not warrant the accuracy, adequacy, suitability or completeness of Material on the CAY Websites.

Use of the CAY Websites is at your own risk. CAY does not guarantee that the CAY Websites or Third Party Websites will be free from viruses, that the CAY Websites will be available, or that access to the CAY Websites or Third Party Websites will be uninterrupted.

You are responsible for taking appropriate precautions for the protection of your computer system and data.

Limitation of liability

Subject to any rights implied by law which cannot be excluded, CAY is not liable to you, whether in contract, tort (including negligence), statute or otherwise, for any losses, damages, liabilities, claims or expenses (including but not limited to legal costs and defence or settlement costs), direct or indirect, whatsoever arising out of or referable to:

  • Your use of the CAY Websites;
  • Material on this website;
  • Your use of Third Party Websites; or
  • Third Party Material.

CAY’s liability for a breach of a condition or warranty implied by law orotherwise, and which cannot be excluded, is limited to the extent possible, at CAY’s option, to:

  • The supply of the goods or services again;
  • The repair of the goods; or
  • The cost of having the goods or services supplied again or repaired.

Termination

Your use of and access to the CAY Websites may be terminated at any time by CAY without notice. All restrictions, licences granted by you and all disclaimers and limitations of liability by CAY will survive termination.

Jurisdiction

Unless otherwise stated, the information on the CAY Websites is provided in compliance with Canadian law and is only intended for persons within Canadian. The CAY Websites may not comply with the laws of countries other than Canada and is not directed at, and should not be relied upon by, persons in any other country.

Copyright and trademarks

Copyright in the Material on this website is owned by or licensed to CAY.

Except where necessary for viewing the Material on this website on your browser, or as permitted under the copyright acts or other applicable laws or these Terms of Use, no Material on this website may be reproduced, adapted, uploaded to a third party, linked to, framed, distributed, displayed or transmitted in any form by any process without the specific written consent of CAY.

You must not use any trademark displayed on the CAY Websites in any way without our express written consent.

Privacy and the use of the website

CAY does not collect any personal information about you when you use the CAY Websites unless:

  • you provide it to us by completing an online application or online form or supplying us with your email address; or
  • you log on and use the services available on the CAY Websites.

CAY may also use third parties to collect statistical information to measure the effectiveness of our online advertising. Any third party involved in this process will not collect personal information.

If you use a link from the CAY Websites to a Third Party Website, the Third Party Website operator is responsible for the security and privacy of your information when you are viewing that website.

CAY’s collection and use of your personal information is described in the CAY privacy policy. By accessing, viewing or otherwise using this website you agree to be subject to the CAY privacy policy.

Our use of “cookies”

“Cookies” are small files of data that reside on your computer and allow us to recognise you as a CAY Websites user if you return to the CAY Websites using the same computer and browser or otherwise use the CAY Websites.

We and our service providers also use cookies to customise our services, content and advertising; measure promotional effectiveness, and promote trust and safety. You may encounter cookies from other businesses when using websites we do not control. For example, if you view a web page created by someone else or use a website developed by another business, there may be a cookie placed by that web page or application.

Acceptance and changes to terms of use

You acknowledge and agree that your use of the CAY Websites indicates your acceptance of these terms of use and the privacy policy as varied from time to time.

These are the current terms of use. They replace any other terms of use for the CAY Websites published on the CAY Websites to date.

CAY may at any time vary the terms of use by publishing the varied terms of use on the CAY Websites. You accept that by doing this, CAY has provided you with sufficient notice of the variation. Your subsequent use of the CAY Websites constitutes acceptance of the varied terms of use.

Privacy policy

Last update: March 4, 2021

Cycling Association of Yukon (CAY) is committed to protecting the privacy of our members’ information. The purpose of this policy is to describe the ways in which we collect, hold, use and disclose personal information.

We may vary this policy from time to time.

How do we collect personal information?

We only collect information that is relevant to our member relationship with you. This information is received directly from you or from other sources who you have approved giving us information.

If we collect personal information from someone else, we will take reasonable steps to ensure that you:

  • have been informed that we have collected that information;
  • understand the purposes for which we have collected that information;
  • and are aware how we might use that information or disclose it to other people.

What personal information do we collect?

The personal information we collect may include:

  • name and contact details;
  • personal details (which might include date of birth);
  • social media information; and
  • other information we require to provide our products and services.

We will not collect any sensitive information such as health information from you.

Why do we collect personal information and how do we use it?

We collect personal information for one or more of the following purposes:

  • to provide products and services to you;
  • managing our member relationship with you;
  • researching and planning for improvement of our programs;
  • and to comply with our legal and regulatory responsibilities.

If we require personal information about you for a specific purpose that is not obvious, we will let you know that purpose at the time the information is collected.

When might we disclose personal information?

We may disclose personal information about you to achieve the same purpose for which it was collected.

Apart from the purposes above we do not give your information to any other person or organization outside our partners.

We might also disclose personal information about you:

  • within our organization and partners;
  • on a confidential basis to external service providers;
  • if we are otherwise permitted or required to do so by law;
  • to other organizations (unless you tell us not to) and their agents for the marketing of their products and services; or
  • in other circumstances where you have first consented to the disclosure.

Website traffic information

Because of the way web communication standards work, when you arrive at or leave the CAY website we automatically receive the web address of the site that you came from or are going to.

We also collect information on which pages of our website you visit while you are on the CAY website, the type of browser you use and the times you access our website.

We use this information to try to understand our users’ preferences better and to manage the load on our servers, so as to improve our service and your experience with CAY.

Our use of “cookies”

“Cookies” are small files of data that reside on your computer and allow us to recognise you as a CAY website user if you return to the CAY site using the same computer and browser or otherwise use the CAY website.

We and our service providers also use cookies to customise our services, content and advertising; measure promotional effectiveness, and promote trust and safety. You may encounter cookies from other businesses when using websites we do not control. For example, if you view a web page created by someone else or use a website developed by another business, there may be a cookie placed by that web page or application.

Storing and retaining personal information

We store personal information in electronic or hardcopy form (or both) and use industry standard levels of security to prevent unauthorised access.

Personal information is only accessible to our board or to authorized service providers with incidental access to supply their services to us.

We do not retain any of your information longer than is required for the member relationship with you or for legal purposes. When we are informed, we will keep the personal information we hold accurate, complete and up to date.

CAY does not disclose personal information to overseas recipients.

Sensitive information

CAY does not collect sensitive information relating to your health, political or religious beliefs, ethnic background or sexual preferences.

Anonymity

Where it is lawful and practicable CAY endeavours to deidentify information collected about you.

Identifiers

CAY does not use identifiers assigned by government agencies (for example: tax file number) to identify any individual.

Marketing

We may use your personal information from time to time to inform you about our current and future programs and events including contacting you by telephone, email, SMS or mail.

You can request that you do not receive direct marketing communications by contacting us directly by email at info@yukoncycling.com or by simply choosing “unsubscribe” any emails you may receive.

Access and correction

We invite you to update and keep current any personal information you thinkwe may hold about you. To do this, or to simply find out what personal information we currently hold, contact us at the address below.

If you wish to access the personal information that we hold about you, we may charge a small fee to cover our costs of supplying that information. We will inform you of this cost at the time you make a request.

If you believe any personal information held by us is inaccurate or out of date you will be given the opportunity to update that personal information.

Queries and complaints

We are committed to this privacy policy for handling personal information and so, if you have any query or complaint in relation to the way in which we collect, use or disclose personal information, contact us. We will use our best efforts to respond to your query or request as quickly as reasonably possible.

For the avoidance of doubt, this policy does not apply to CAY board records.

If you like more information about our privacy policy, or in relation to the information we hold, contact us.

By mail:

Cycling Association of Yukon
C/O Sport Yukon
4061 4th Avenue
Whitehorse, YT
Y1A 1H1

By email:

info@yukoncycling.com

Strategic plan

Last update: April 11, 2021

The development of the 2021 to 2024 CAY strategic plan engaged CAY members, board members and community members at all levels of cycling in Yukon.

A new phase of strategic planning began in November 2020 with the Yukon cycling survey. After results were collected and analyzed, CAY board members met to review the reports and engage its membership in further conversations and feedback.

The strategic plan is the ongoing reference for CAY as we move toward 2024. It aligns CAY activities from mandate and role to objectives, strategies and tactics.

On an annual basis, the CAY board will closely monitor Yukon cycling’s progress against these initiatives to ensure achievement of our objectives.

View the plan

Download strategic plan

Funding programs

Last update: April 8, 2022

As the sport governing body for cycling in Yukon, Cycling Association of Yukon offers different funding programs for its affiliate clubs and members. These programs are only available to sport governing bodies and you must be a CAY member to apply.

Sport Foundations grant funding

This funding is for Yukon sport governing bodies and is available in 4 categories:

  • Athlete development;
  • Leadership development;
  • Administration or organizational development; and/or
  • Special project or community development (special projects).

How to apply for Sport Foundations funding through CAY

  • If you are a member of an affiliate club, contact info@yukoncycling.com with your ideas and the CAY board of directors will evaluate their potential inclusion in our annual funding application.
  • Send us your proposal by March 31.
  • Our CAY application is due April 15.

Podium Pathway grant

This funding supports sport initiatives for sport groups. The funding is available in 4 categories.

  • Enhanced athlete development;
  • Rural and Aboriginal participation;
  • Coaching enhancement; and/or
  • Coaching salary subsidy.

How to apply for Podium Pathway funding through CAY

  • If you are a member of an affiliate club, contact info@yukoncycling.com with your ideas and the CAY board of directors will evaluate their potential inclusion in our annual YSFL funding application.
  • Send us your proposal by March 31.
  • Our CAY application is due April 15.

What we do

Last update: June 14, 2022

Cycling Association of Yukon (CAY) is the non-profit, volunteer-run sport governing body for cycling in Yukon.

We are the affiliated Provincial Sport Organization (PSO) of Cycling Canada.

CAY operates under the authority of the world governing body of all cycling's many sports, the Union Cycliste International (UCI).

Our mandate and role

The mandate of CAY is to develop, promote and grow the sport of cycling in Yukon.

Our role is to lead, regulate and empower.

Board

The CAY board is the ultimate authority for cycling-related matters in Yukon. The board has the authority over the affairs of CAY through its bylaws, terms of reference and objects and is accountable to the membership of CAY and its affiliate clubs and teams.

The board meets and communicates throughout the year to plan and coordinate the programs and services offered by CAY to our affiliate clubs, teams and membership.

Our current board is:

  • President - Geof Harries
  • Vice President - Sue Richards
  • Secretary - Jan Downing
  • Treasurer - Jane Koepke
  • Director - Forest Pearson
  • Director - Brenda Jenner
  • Director - Devin Knopf
  • Director - Steven Biss

How to become part of the board

All members and clubs have the opportunity to run and vote for members of the board.

The CAY board is elected by the general membership at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) every year.

Annual general meeting

The CAY AGM is typically held in June, as our fiscal year-end is March 31.

An announcement will be published on our website and in other communications beforehand.

Safe sport

Last update: March 29, 2022

Cycling Association of Yukon is committed to providing our athletes, coaches, officials and volunteers with a safe and inclusive environment that fosters and preserves a positive, healthy, and enjoyable experience for all individuals.

We embrace our responsibility to cultivate an environment that is free from abuse, harassment and discrimination, and we encourage individuals to feel empowered and comfortable reporting any behaviour that breaches Cycling Canada’s Code of Conduct.

Safe Sport framework

As the sport governing body for cycling in Yukon, CAY is working with Cycling Canada to develop a Safe Sport framework. The framework is built upon policy, education and advocacy initiatives to further strengthen the administration and delivery of our programs, events and services.

Policy

A comprehensive set of principles that establish expected behaviour, guide decision-making, and promote accountability for all individuals associated with Cycling Canada.

Education

Activities that enhance knowledge, develop reasoning and judgement, as well as foster positive interactions and practices in the community.

Advocacy

Initiatives that create awareness, inspire, and actively promote Cycling Canada’s Safe Sport principles in all local, national, and international activities.

Safe Sport Officers

As part of this commitment to Safe Sport, Cycling Canada has selected W&W Dispute Resolution Services Inc. as its independent, third-party contact (Safe Sport Officer) who is empowered to supersede Cycling Canada staff and launch appropriate investigations as required based on policies, evidence or a situation reported.

The independent Safe Sport Officer has significant experience dealing with sport disputes and concerns. For Safe Sport inquiries or concerns related to policy and/or procedures, please contact us at safesport_wwdrs@primus.ca.

For Team Yukon or CAY-affiliated club related concerns/complaints, we encourage individuals to contact the CAY President directly at info@yukoncycling.com who is the approved Safe Sport Officer.

Situations involving forms of misconduct such as emotional or physical misconduct, bullying, hazing or harassment should be reported immediately.

For Safe Sport questions with regards to our educational program or general information, please contact Cycling Canada at safesport@cyclingcanada.ca or CAY at info@yukoncycling.com.

Canadian Sport Helpline

An independent helpline has been set up with the support of Sport Canada and the Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada.

Anyone with a concern who is not comfortable reaching out to Cycling Canada’s appointed independent Safe Sport Officer, should feel comfortable reaching out to this free and confidential service as well.

Information on their services and how to contact them can be found at abuse-free-sport.ca.

The abuse free sport phone and texting line is accessible at 1-888-83-SPORT, and is monitored from 6 am to 6 pm Yukon time.

COVID-19 guidance

Last update: March 7, 2021

Our guidance is based on information from Government of Yukon and Cycling Canada.

If you have questions about this guidance, contact info@yukoncycling.com.

Personal health

  • All participants, coaches, trainers, riders, staff or anyone else who will be part of a cycling activity should be acutely aware of and must continuously monitor their own personal health.
  • Any person who has had a confirmed case of COVID-19, or who has come into close contact with a person who has a confirmed case, should isolate, not be part of a cycling activity for at least 14 days and seek appropriate medical attention.
  • Individuals should self-monitor for symptoms of COVID-19 on a daily basis and any person showing symptoms should self-isolate, refrain from cycling activities and avoid coming into close contact with others.
  • Individuals with elevated risk for COVID-19 infection should take any necessary further precautions to protect themselves. Implement further measures to ensure an inclusive and safe environment.
  • Use the Government of Yukon self-assessment tool: Assess yourself for Coronavirus (COVID-19).

Physical distance

  • Any activity must respect the social and physical distancing recommendations currently in effect by Government of Yukon.
  • Always maintain 2 metres between all individuals before, during and after cycling activities.
  • Be conscious while riding to respect physical distance between riders as well as with other cyclists, joggers, pedestrians, etc.
  • Modify your group activities to limit or eliminate contact between participants.
  • Limit your activities to small groups. Although organised gatherings, including cycling events are limited to 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors, this means everyone who attends, including spectators, officials and others.

Group gathering size

  • Activity group size, including all riders, coaches, parents, personnel, officials and required safety personnel must respect Government of Yukon group gathering size restrictions.
  • Groups should be kept to a minimum practical size to reduce risk where possible.
  • Individual activities are the most ideal, including virtual or individual time trials.
  • Mass start events should use staggered start times to encourage spreading out; several minutes in between is recommended. Faster participants should go first to discourage passing of other participants.
  • If multiple groups are established (such as a paceline) they should be kept intact so that the same group of people are riding together, and the circle of potential contact is not expanded unnecessarily.
  • Limit or eliminate all occasions for congregation of parents or athletes/participants in parking lots or any other gathering areas.

Sanitation

  • Limit the use of any communal or shared equipment and avoid the sharing of equipment between participants if possible.
  • Any surfaces which may be touched by multiple individuals should be sanitized before and after each training session.
  • Sanitation practices should follow Government of Yukon guidelines for cleaning hard surfaces.
  • Ask each participant to bring hand sanitizer and regularly remind them to wash their hands.

Safety contingencies

  • Educate coaches to recognize the symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Ask participants under the age of 18 for a consent from a parent/guardian.
  • Coaches/leaders should be aware of and understand the processes outlined in the Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan.
  • Coaches and ride leaders should always have gloves, masks and hand sanitizer available to protect themselves should contact become necessary in the case of an emergency.
  • During this time, unnecessary risks should be avoided. Riders, participants and coaches should use common sense to avoid any situation which involves undue risk and the potential need for emergency personnel to respond, or that unnecessary personal contact becomes necessary.

Use of recreational or sports facilities

  • Clubs should contact info@yukoncycling.com to understand the local risks and implications of resuming cycling activities, in addition to the use of sport facilities or any public recreation areas to support outdoor activity.
  • Consider all potential restrictions or considerations for the place of an organized cycling activity such as park or facility closures or any other modified restrictions on public space usage.
  • Coaches and club leaders should ensure proper medical and sanitation equipment is available.
  • Cyclists should arrive for a cycling activity wearing their kit and equipment.
  • If using a recreational or sports facility, limit contact with surfaces and facility staff.

HopOn kids cycling program

Last update: August 10, 2022

HopOn is a games-based cycling program, run in partnership with Cycling Canada that teaches school-aged kids across our country the joys of cycling safely.

HopOn levels

The HopOn program uses a colour-coded levels system to help identify the skill levels of different riders. Programming will be adapted on an individual basis so that all participants can be challenged and learn.

Register for HopOn

August 24 to 28, 2022. Level 3 and 4

Level 3 intermediate (blue)
Register your child for Level 3 if they are comfortable turning quickly, are able to look behind while going straight and can roll off a sidewalk curb.

Level 4 advanced (black)
Register your child for Level 4 if they can lift their front wheel, tap their foot while riding and put their hand on a partner's shoulder while riding.

    • 1 to 1.5-hour session, 5 days in total
    • Time: 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on August 24, 25 and 26. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on August 27 and 28
    • Location: Porter Creek Secondary school baseball field (at back of school). View location on map
    • Number of spots available: 20
    • Age range: Typically between 7 to 10 years old for Level 3 and 8 to 12 years old for Level 4
    • Cost: $60 ($30 program registration and $30 mini-membership)

    Register for August 2022 HopOn

    September 12 to 28, 2022. Level 2

    Level 2 beginner (green)
    Register your child for Level 2 if they can stop and start quickly, change gears and tap their head with a hand while riding.

      • 1-hour session, 6 days in total
      • Time: 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on September 12, 14, 19, 21, 26 and 28
      • Location: Porter Creek Secondary school baseball field (at back of school). View location on map
      • Number of spots available: 12
      • Age range: Typically between 6 to 9 years old for Level 2
      • Cost: $60 ($30 program registration and $30 mini-membership)

      Register for September 2022 HopOn

      Trail etiquette and tips

      Last update: March 4, 2021

      Contagious Mountain Bike Club (CMBC) publishes trail etiquette and riding tips that follow International Mountain Bicycling Association’s (IMBA) recommendations.

      Read about how to ride and take care of Yukon trails.

      Trail development and maintenance

      Last update: March 4, 2021

      Contagious Mountain Bike Club (CMBC) is City of Whitehorse’s trail stewart.

      When it comes to building trails, this means that City of Whitehorse and CMBC have official procedures to follow and policies about public safety, user conflict avoidance and environmental stewardship to consider and abide by.

      CMBC works with its members to design trails, assist with applications and contribute volunteer support to trail building and maintenance efforts.

      Learn how to get involved with trail development and trail maintenance in Whitehorse and surrounding areas.

      Bicycle commuting maps and advocacy

      Last update: March 4, 2021

      City of Whitehorse published a Bicycle Network Plan in 2018. They shared documents and maps that describe existing and proposed plans for safe, bicycle friendly commuting.

      Members of the Whitehorse Urban Cycling Coalition (WUCC) provided valuable input on the overall network design and comments on a draft version of the plan. WUCC continues to work with City of Whitehorse today.

      To get involved with bicycle network planning and cycling advocacy, contact Whitehorse Urban Cycling Coalition.

      Mountain bike trail maps and conditions

      Last update: March 4, 2021

      Contagious Mountain Bike Club (CMBC) publishes information about Yukon trails and areas.

      The most up-to-date trail maps and trail reports can be found on Trailforks.

      Get involved

      You can help CMBC to develop and maintain trails by joining CMBC as a member to assist with the work and by donating funds on Trailforks.

      100% of your Trailforks donation goes directly to CMBC.

      Team Yukon

      Last update: March 4, 2021

      CAY delivers high performance and development programs to encourage excellence in sport and help Yukon targeted athletes develop to their full potential.

      Participants are typically in the Train to Train through to the Learn to Win stages of the Long Term Athlete Development model.

      Usually this means they enter Train to Train at 12 to 16 years of age for male and 11 to 15 for females, both with 3 to 6 years of cycling experience.

      Learn to Win is generally 19 to 23 years of age for male or female, with 8 or more years in cycling.

      Our high performance program aims to transition targeted athletes onto National teams and supports athletes and coaches to achieve podium-reaching performances at competitions such as the Canada Summer Games.

      CAY also provides athletes and coaches with enhanced services and opportunities for development.

      What is a targeted athlete?

      By virtue of its status as a “targeted sport”, CAY is eligible to nominate selected athletes and their coaches for enhanced benefits, programs and services support through the Canadian Sport Institute and Sport Yukon.

      Team Yukon athlete selection

      Targeted cyclists and their coaches must apply to CAY to be considered. Applications are reviewed by CAY’s board members and Team Yukon coaches.

      If approved by CAY, their names are put forward to the Canadian Sport Institute.

      Selected athletes and coaches will be notified by CAY and provided with information on how to register with Canadian Sport Institute.

      Athletes and coaches must apply with CAY to initiate the process, which will provide them with their athlete or coach card that gives them access to the programs and support services to which they are entitled.

      Athletes who do not apply to CAY may forfeit their eligibility for enhanced benefits, programs and services the following year.

      Apply for Team Yukon

      Our targeted athlete list is valid from January 1 to December 31 of the following year.

      If you have not applied, you still can. However, applications are only able to be resubmitted once per month.

      This list allows athletes who hit the criteria throughout the year to access these services and benefits.

      Contact info@yukoncycling.com to get started.

      Affiliate a club or team

      Last update: May 19, 2021

      CAY represents and supports affiliated clubs and teams throughout Yukon.

      These groups enrich the cycling experience with their involvement in activities such as:

      • Recreational events;
      • Competitive races;
      • Training and athlete development;
      • Group rides;
      • Instructional clinics;
      • Cycling advocacy and safety; and/or
      • Trail development and maintenance.

      Affiliate a club or team

      Contact info@yukoncycling.com for an application form.

      Affiliation is $125 per year.

      Benefits of club or team affiliation

      • Access to Cycling Canada’s national insurance program for your club's events and its volunteers, officers, directors, coaches, managers, employees, officials, member participants and auxiliary workers while acting within the scope of their duties on behalf of CAY and a club;
      • Be covered for comprehensive general liability ($10 million) and sport accident ($50,000 for injuries occurred during an event) insurance during CAY registered or sanctioned events, programs and clinics;
      • Each membership sold contributes to the health of cycling in the territory. 100% of our Yukon cycling supporter fee goes towards Yukon trail maintenance activities, kids programs, cycling advocacy and safe-cycling initiatives. Affiliation grows our sport and strengthens the voice for cycling in Yukon;
      • Exposure and promotion through the CAY website, social media and email newsletter as well as other partners;
      • Access to funding opportunities from CAY partner organizations including Sport Yukon, Cycling Canada, Government of Yukon and Lotteries Yukon;
      • Access to funding through the CAY Yukon cycling supporter program;
      • A direct link to the largest group of organized and active cyclists in the territory in all disciplines and age categories;
      • The right for the club name to be on race licenses and results; and
      • The right to accept CAY and Sport Yukon recognition awards.

      What is an affiliated Yukon club and team?

      Affiliated clubs are not-for-profit groups that have a minimum of 5 directors and/or board members, a set of by-laws and a constitution.

      Any club that does not meet the 5 person minimum will be considered a team.

      Each member must be insured by holding a current CAY member licence that is to be renewed annually. The club exists to organize cycling events for its members, has an open membership and belongs to members.

      Club requirements

      • It is recommended but not required that clubs be registered as a not-for-profit society; clubs are to have a minimum of 5 directors and/or board members, a set of by-laws and a constitution;
      • All board members must be licensed members of CAY;
      • All club members must be licensed members of CAY;
      • All team managers, coaches and staff must have a UCI technical license;
      • All scheduled club activities have been approved by CAY. Learn how to sanction a club event with CAY; and
      • Helmets must be worn at all times during club activities.

      If a club elects not to use CAY membership insurance, CAY must be named on your organization's event insurance certificates.

      Coaches and group ride leaders

      • Anyone referring to themselves or acting as a coach must hold a valid technical license with their NCCP coaching certification on it. Cycling Canada and CAY only recognizes NCCP as valid coaching credentials.
      • As a NCCP certified coach you are covered for liability, professional liability and even sexual abuse claims made against you for the liabilities to third parties (including club members) that you instructed.
      • An individual who is acting as a group ride leader (responsible for the course, everyone's safe return) does not have to be an NCCP coach.

      What type of insurance will my club or team members have?

      CAY members are covered for comprehensive general liability ($10 million) and sport accident ($50,000 for injuries occurred during an event) insurance during CAY-sanctioned or registered events, programs and clinics.

      All employees, volunteers, officers, directors, coaches, managers, officials, member participants and auxiliary workers while acting within the scope of their duties on behalf of CAY and a club are covered.

      When is the insurance valid?

      CAY members are covered during registered or sanctioned club activities as listed on the club.

      If additional club activities are added through the year, CAY must be notified before the activities take place in order for the club and its members to be covered.

      Are trail development and maintenance activities covered?

      These types of events cannot be sanctioned, therefore general members will not have coverage but board members do.

      For club board members

      Affiliate club board members are covered under the insurance program as Directors and Officers.

      For general members

      At this time, trail development and maintenance events cannot be covered by Cycling Canada’s national insurance program and a general CAY membership licence does not apply.

      Insurance coverage for general members must be arranged separately by the organizing club.

      This may change in the future.

      How do I report a medical claim?

      If an accident occurs while participating in a club activity, a club member has 30 days to report an injury.

      Contact info@yukoncycling.com to begin the process of reporting a claim.

      Affiliated clubs and teams

      Last update: April 8, 2022

      CAY represents and supports affiliated cycling clubs and teams throughout Yukon.

      Learn how to affiliate a club or team.

      These groups enrich the cycling experience with their involvement in activities such as:

      • Recreational events;
      • Competitive races;
      • Training and athlete development;
      • Group rides;
      • Instructional clinics;
      • Cycling advocacy and safety; and/or
      • Trail development and maintenance.

      U Kon Echelon

      U Kon Echelon is a community cycling club that focuses on youth, family and adult cycling. They support the cycling community by hosting group rides, races, bike safety courses, fundraising and team travel. Adult and parent riders and volunteers are always welcome. Their focus is road cycling, XC mountain biking and fat biking.

      Velonorth Cycling Club

      Velonorth seeks to create a vibrant cycling culture in Whitehorse by offering fun, inclusive and unique road and mixed surface events for riders at all levels.

      Yukon Mountain Bike Team

      The purpose of the Yukon Mountain Bike Team is to develop great athletes and better people through a dedicated training and racing program.

      Yukon Road Cycling Team

      The Yukon Road Cycling Team is run by U Kon Echelon.

      Become a supporter

      Last update: June 7, 2022

      Cycling Association of Yukon (CAY) is the non-profit, volunteer-run sport governing body for cycling in the Yukon.

      CAY is also the affiliated Provincial Sport Organization (PSO) of Cycling Canada.

      Yukon cycling supporter program

      Our Yukon cycling supporter program is a $10 fee that is charged to everyone when they register for a CAY membership licence.

      100% of the fee goes towards Yukon trail maintenance activities, kids programs, cycling advocacy and safe-cycling initiatives.

      Registered non-profit societies can join us as Yukon cycling supporter affiliates. We also welcome business sponsorship.

      Questions?

      Contact info@yukoncycling.com if you need more information.

      Become a member

      Last update: February 8, 2022

      Get your 2022 Cycling Association of Yukon membership licence

      You can buy a membership licence online through CCN Bikes. All members must sign a waiver, done through the online registration process. For under-age cyclists, a parent/guardian must sign the electronic waiver. You can also join a Yukon cycling club.

      Benefits of a CAY membership licence

      By becoming a CAY member you're not only protecting yourself with insurance during events and races but you're also supporting the development of Yukon cycling at all levels.

      Our Yukon cycling supporter fee goes towards Yukon trail maintenance activities, kids programs, cycling advocacy and safe-cycling initiatives. Your membership grows our sport and strengthens the voice for cycling in Yukon.

      Buy a membership licence

      Choose the type of 2022 membership licence to meet your needs

      Benefit Adult (17 and older) Youth (under 17) Adult UCI race (17 and older) Youth UCI race (under 17) UCI technical
      Eligible to participate in sanctioned Yukon cycling events including races, group rides and mass participation events. Additional registration fees may apply.
      Eligible to participate in sanctioned Yukon cycling programs and instructional clinics, including HopOn. Additional registration fees may apply.
      Join a CAY affiliate club. Additional club fees may apply.
      Membership with Cycling Canada and eligible for partner discounts. More information about how to get discounts in February 2022.
      Be covered for comprehensive general liability ($10 million) and sport accident ($50,000 for injuries occurred during an event) insurance during CAY-sanctioned events, programs and clinics.
      Eligible to participate in events outside Yukon, including provincial/state-sanctioned races, National Championships and other nationally or internationally sanctioned races. All event disciplines.


      Work as a commissaire, coach, team manager, soigneur, organizer, mechanic, caravan driver or agent.



      Yukon cycling supporter fee. $10 from your membership goes to support Yukon trail maintenance activities, kids programs, cycling advocacy and safe-cycling initiatives.
      Optional. Buy ($20) extra insurance that covers you on unsanctioned training rides. Read more about Sport accident coverage under Commonly asked questions below.
      Price
      All memberships are valid from January 1, 2022 to December 31, 2022.

      Cost includes a Cycling Canada member affiliation fee that goes towards national programs and support to CAY and its affiliated clubs and members. You also get partner discounts.
      $60.00 $40.00 $80.00 $60.00 $0.00

      Commonly asked questions about our insurance program

      What does the Liability Policy cover?

      It would be lengthy to list all the insuring agreements under the policy but, in many cases, inquiries relate to the concept of Liability Insurance.

      General Liability Insurance is designed to protect a person (member) or any entity (CAY, Club) against any legal responsibility arising out of a negligent act or a failure to act as a prudent person would have acted, which results in bodily injury or property damage to another party.

      Who is an Insured?

      All employees, volunteers, officers, directors, coaches, managers, officials, member participants, auxiliary workers while acting within the scope of their duties on behalf of CAY and a club.

      What is a sanctioned event?

      Sanctioned events include all competitions or sports demonstrations run by CAY and or by member clubs in good standing authorized by CAY including related training at sites of events and club premises.

      Training

      What is considered training under the Liability Policy?

      Liability does not provide 24-hour coverage. All training activities must be documented and approved by CAY. Commuting and recreational cycling activities (i.e riding bike to the store) are not considered training.

      Clubs

      What is the definition with respect to a member of the insurance program?

      The insurance is based on the "reported" member’s names on file with CAY. The membership numbers are reported to the insurance brokers office of Arthur J. Gallagher Canada Limited.

      What activities are covered?

      All sanctioned and approved Cycling activities including competitions run by clubs who are members in good standing.

      What about events with non-member participants?

      Provided the event is sanctioned and the ratio of non-members is within the parameters set by CAY. Please note that insurance benefits will only extend to members however, if a non-member is named individually in a lawsuit they will not be defended by the Liability Policy.

      Can a non-member be signed up as a club member at the time of the event?

      Yes, as long as the waivers are signed, insurance premium collected, and these individuals are included in the reported membership numbers to CAY for the insurance program.

      Are the member bicycles covered?

      Personal belongings of members are not covered automatically. Arthur J. Gallagher Canada Limited has arranged a Bike Insurance Program where members can pay an additional premium to insure their bicycles. Please contact us for more information.

      Sport accident

      Does the policy provide 24-hour coverage?

      No, only while participating in a training program, sanctioned tour, competition and traveling to and from the program, which is approved by and under the supervision of proper authority of the CAY or the club of which the Insured is a member.

      Is it possible to expand this coverage to include individual, non-sanctioned training activities (members training on their own time)?

      Yes, for an additional fee the Sport Accident Coverage can be extended to cover individual training activities. This is an option when you buy a membership licence online.

      Does the Sport Accident Policy cover members participating in training camps outside of Canada?

      Yes, as long as it is a sanctioned training camp, the policy will cover medical expenses incurred upon return to Canada. Expenses incurred abroad will require Travel Medical Coverage.

      Sanction a club event

      Last update: May 1, 2021

      In order to support the growth of and participation in cycling events throughout Yukon, we offer 2 levels of event sanctioning: Club and territorial race.

      These levels are designed to provide options for organizers and participants: from recreational events to instructional clinics and group rides to competitive races.

      About sanctioned club events

      Sanctioned club events are run following best practices, and have fewer restrictions placed on categories and equipment regulations, differing from sanctioned territorial race events in order to provide a more accessible entry point into events for those new or who are regular to the sport.

      Sanctioned club events often include recreational, group rides, instructional and grassroots racing.

      Participants and organizers are covered under CAY’s insurance policies.

      Benefits of sanctioning a club event

      • Inclusion in Yukon cycling events calendar;
      • Accessible entry point into the sport for new or regular participants;
      • Increased participation in recreational, group rides, instructional and grassroots-racing events;
      • Safe event environment, run to best practices;
      • Comprehensive general liability insurance coverage;
      • Sport accident insurance coverage;
      • 1-day CAY membership licence available for unlicensed riders, with 1-day insurance available;
      • Athlete development.

      Sanctioned club events are split into 3 types: club, community and mass participation.

      Club events

      Activities can be group rides, on/off-bike training sessions or any other club activity where multiple club members are involved. Participants are required to either have a current CAY membership licence or to obtain a 1-day CAY membership licence through the event organizer (if offered).

      In order to facilitate the introduction of new riders to clubs, riders that are not part of the organizing club and are not CAY members may choose to participate in up to 2 club activities per year without having a licence. Non-members are required to fill out a release form, managed by the club organizer.

      There is no CAY charge for club member activities, but there may be additional fees from the organizer.

      Community events

      Community events are open to riders including and outside of the organizing club.

      In order to ensure community events are carried out safely, they should not exceed 100 participants or during the COVID-19 pandemic, must adhere to current public health guidelines.

      Community activities are included on the CAY event calendar. These activities are not officiated by commissaires, but organizers agree to run them following best practices.

      Participants are required to either have a current CAY membership licence or to obtain a 1-day CAY membership licence through the event organizer (if offered).

      Community events, mass participation

      Mass participation events are events such as charity rides, large community events or fondos.

      Participants are required to either have a current CAY membership licence or to obtain a 1-day CAY membership licence through the event organizer (if offered).

      Mass participation events are not restricted by maximum participation numbers but during the COVID-19 pandemic, must adhere to current public health guidelines.

      Similar to community events, these activities are not officiated by commissaires, but organizers agree to run them while following best practices.

      What about trail development and maintenance activities?

      At this time, trail development and maintenance events cannot be covered by Cycling Canada’s national insurance program and a CAY membership licence does not apply. These types of events also cannot be registered or sanctioned.

      Insurance coverage must be arranged separately by the organizing club.

      This may change in the future.

      How to sanction a club event

      Only events hosted by CAY affiliated clubs and organizers are eligible for either type of sanctioning.

      Membership in CAY is required by all participants in CAY sanctioned events. Membership is available by virtue of a CAY membership licence.

      There is no CAY charge for sanctioned events, but there may be additional fees from the organizer.

      The following steps are required in order to sanction an event:

      Step 1: Become a member

      If you are an individual organizer, either yourself or another member of your organization needs to be a CAY member. If the event is hosted by a Yukon club that is a registered non-profit society, then all board members should be members of CAY.

      Step 2: Affiliate your club or team with CAY

      Affiliate a club or team.

      Step 3: Review this page

      Review this page (sanction a club event) or our sanction a territorial race event page and determine which type is suitable for your event. If you need help choosing the type, contact info@yukoncycling.com.

      Step 4: Contact us

      When you are ready to sanction your event, contact info@yukoncycling.com for an events consultation.

      Note – Be aware that you may be required to prepare an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), a list of permitting parties (landowners, municipalities, territorial agencies, etc.) and a map of road or trail closures if applicable. If you are serving alcohol at your event, we will also require a copy of your liquor license.

      Sanction a territorial race event

      Last update: March 7, 2021

      In order to support the growth of and participation in cycling events throughout Yukon, we offer 2 levels of event sanctioning: club and territorial race.

      These levels are designed to provide options for organizers and participants: from recreational events to instructional clinics and group rides to competitive races.

      Sanctioning an event mitigates the expenses and organizational burden of insuring an event. CAY is a territorial affiliate of Cycling Canada, and therefore events sanctioned by CAY are included in the national insurance plan coverage.

      About sanctioned territorial race events

      Territorial race sanctioning is an official designation approving and licensing competitive cycling events in Yukon consistent with UCI and Cycling Canada rules and regulations.

      Organizers who sanction their events as territorial races are committed to following the rules and regulations of the sport, to fair play and to providing a safe environment for participants and spectators alike.

      Benefits of sanctioning your event

      • Increased prestige;
      • Inclusion and promotion as Territorial race in the Yukon cycling events calendar;
      • Points awarded for category upgrades and territorial standings as CAY will assign commissaires to attend and oversee the event;
      • Comprehensive general liability insurance coverage;
      • Sport accident insurance coverage;
      • 1-day CAY membership licence available for unlicensed riders, with 1-day insurance available;
      • Youth development; and
      • High performance projects.

      How to sanction a territorial race event

      Only events hosted by CAY affiliated clubs and organizers are eligible for either type of sanctioning.

      Membership in CAY is required by all participants in CAY sanctioned events. Membership is available by virtue of a CAY membership licence.

      There is no CAY charge for sanctioned events, but there may be additional fees from the organizer.

      Step 1: Become a member

      If you are an individual organizer, either yourself or another member of your organization needs to be a CAY member. If the event is hosted by a Yukon club that is a registered non-profit society, then all board members should be members of CAY.

      Step 2: Affiliate your club or team with CAY

      Affiliate a club or team.

      Step 3: Review this page

      Review this page (sanction a territorial race event) or sanction a club event page and determine which type is suitable for your event. If you need help choosing the type, contact info@yukoncycling.com.

      Step 4: Contact us

      When you are ready to sanction your event, contact info@yukoncycling.com for an events consultation.

      Note – Be aware that you may be required to prepare an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), a list of permitting parties (landowners, municipalities, territorial agencies, etc.) and a map of road or trail closures if applicable. If you are serving alcohol at your event, we will also require a copy of your liquor license.


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